Home GRAMMAR CONNOTATION

CONNOTATION

Grammar Connotation
WHAT IS CONNOTATION?
  • A feeling or an idea in addition to word’s literal or main meaning
  • Meaning is a secondary word used to express an idea, qualities or feeling in association to its literal meaning
  • Refers to a meaning that is implied by a word apart from the thing which it describes explicitly
  • A non-literal framing of a term that intends to add an association beyond its literal meaning
  • Implied meaning of a word or phrase
  • A secondary meaning to the literal definition
  • A further understanding of a word’s meaning
  • Refers to the emotional implications and associations
  • A word can carry an additional associated idea
  • A word can have a positive, neutral, or a negative connotation
  • It can also be either cultural or personal

 

TYPES OF CONNOTATION
  • Negative Connotation
    A word or symbol has a non-literal association that we regard as bad.
  • Positive Connotation
    A word or symbol has a non-literal association that we regard as good.
  • Neutral Connotation
    A word or symbol has a non-literal association that we don’t regard as good or bad.

 

EXAMPLES

Challenge vs. Difficult

Positive: Yesterday’s session was a challenge.
Negative: Yesterday’s session was very difficult.

For something to be a challenge, it’s not necessarily bad, you may actually enjoy it. But, a difficult situation is usually unpleasant.

Energetic vs. Hyperactive

Positive: His son is more than a little energetic.
Negative: His son is more than a little hyperactive.

Most children are energetic; that can be a lot of fun to be around. But hyper-reaction insinuates just a little bit too much.

Economical vs. Cheap

Positive: Before he makes any purchases, John likes to do his research; he’s very economical.
Negative: Before he makes any purchases, John likes to do his research; he’s so cheap.

When we think of someone economical, we tend to consider them to be logical and wise. Meanwhile, cheap is a derogatory term for someone stingy.

Generous vs. Extravagant

Positive: Your gift to the Trust was too generous.
Negative: Your gift to the Trust was too extravagant.

To compliment someone’s generosity is to offer high praise. If, however, you call their act of kindness extravagant, you’re telling them they went too far (and that’s hardly complimentary).

 

POSITIVE CONNOTATION NEGATIVE CONNOTATION
impulsive impetuous
slender skinny
steadfast stubborn
modest mousy
unique peculiar
tolerant unprincipled
incident accident
interested nosy
determined unyielding
debate
argue
confident
egotistical
childlike
childish
courageous
conceited
vintage decrepit
prudent
cowardly
fragrance
 odor
delayed
 tardy
 easy gawky
 shrewd  cunning
slim scrawny
cabin shack

 

POSITIVE CONNOTATION NEUTRAL CONNOTATION NEGATIVE CONNOTATION
unique different peculiar
elated happy manic
assertive forceful domineering
employ use exploit
thrifty saving stingy
confident secure egotistical
self-confident proud conceited
innocent adolescent immature
slim thin skinny

 

ENGLISH SPEAKING EXPRESSIONS_03

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

error: Content is protected !!